Stefan Caddy-Retalic

SCR_profile

My work focuses on how to effectively detect meaningful environmental change with limited resources. I integrate biomolecular techniques (stable isotopes, metabarcoding) with traditional ecological survey methods (vegetation metrics, invertebrate trapping) to integrate species change from a population to biome level. My field sites span a strong climate gradient from the south coast of South Australia through the Mt Lofty Ranges, Flinders Ranges, Gammon Ranges and Stony Plains to investigate changes within species, communities and biomes to better understand the interrelationships and drivers of biodiversity change.

In addition to my interests in theoretical and field ecology and discipline specific work, I am committed to ensuring my research addresses real world problems. I am particularly interested in the interface between science and policy, as well as bridging the gap between ecological theory and the current needs of land managers.

I completed a BSc (Biodiversity and Conservation), Bachelor of Innovation and Enterprise, and Honours degree in marine biophysics from Flinders University. After graduating, I worked in environmental policy and was part of the team that ran the National Environmental Research Program for the commonwealth government. I also managed science projects for the University of Adelaide and Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN). Prior to starting my PhD, I was Director of the Australian Transect Network, the TERN facility focused on exploring biodiversity response to environmental change.

My scientific collaborators include Prof Andrew Lowe, Prof Glenda Wardle and Dr Francesca McInerney (who form my supervisory panel), as well as Prof Alan Andersen, Dr Ben Hoffmann and Dr Andrew Bissett.

My scientific publications are listed on my Google Scholar page. I also occasionally write for The Conversation. A brief CV can be found here.

Collecting water lillies in northern Australia

Collecting water lillies in northern Australia

Field work takes me to some amazing places. Enjoying the scenery of the Gulf of Carpentaria with our team after a long day in the field.

Field work takes me to some amazing places. Enjoying the scenery of the Gulf of Carpentaria with our team after a long day in the field.

Collecting soil metagenomic samples in the northern Flinders Ranges

Collecting soil metagenomic samples in the northern Flinders Ranges